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PTH failed to decrease with Vitamin D if overweight and had low Magnesium – Aug 2019

Low dietary magnesium intake alters vitamin D-parathyroid hormone relationship in adults who are overweight or obese.

Nutr Res. 2019 Aug 8;69:82-93. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2019.08.003.

VitaminDWiki
  • Do not recall seeing this before
  • Probably important to take lots of Magnesium if overweight and raising vitamin D levels

Items in both of the categories of Magnesium AND Obesity

Magnesium and Vitamin D contains the following summary

244 items in category, see also


Overview Magnesium and vitamin D Has a venn diagram of relationship of Mg and Vit D

Magnesium not Magnesium
Vitamin D Magnesium or Vitamin D
Aging, Amytrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Alzheimer's Disease;
Asthma, Attention Deficit Disorder; Autism, Cancer, Cerebrovascular,
Chronic Fatigue, Diabetes, Hearing Loss, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Atherosclerosis,
Cardiovascular Disease, HIV, AIDS; Hypertension; Kidney Stones,
Migraine Headache, Multiple Sclerosis, Obesity, Osteoporosis; Peripheral vascular disease;
Pregnancy-related problems,Rheumatoid Arthritis; Sports-related problems,
Vitamin D only
Acne, Allergy, Autoimmune, Bone, Breathing,
Celiac, Cognition, Colds and Flu, Cystic Fibrosis,
Dental, Fertility, Hyperparathyroid, Immunity, Kidney,
Liver, Lupus, Osteoarthritis, Pain - chronic, Parkinson,
Psoriasis, Rickets, Strokes, Sarcoidosis, Thyroid, Parathyroid,
Tuberculosis, Vision, Hair, Skin, Sports
Not Vitamin D Magnesium only
Aggressive Behavior, Alcoholism, Arrhythmia, Cerebral Palsy,
Chemical Sensitivity, Cluster Headaches; Cocaine-related Stroke; Constipation,
Cramps, Fluoride Toxicity; Head Injuries, Central Nervous System Injuries,
Magnesium Deficiency; Menopause, Mitral Valve Prolapse,
Nystagmus, Psychiatric Disorders; Repetitive Strain Injury, Sickle Cell Disease, SIDS,
Stress, Stuttering, Tetanus; Tinnitis, Sound Sensitivity; TMJ; Toxic Shock; Violence
Neither
ALL OTHER DISEASES

 Download the PDF from Sci-Hub via VitaminDWiki

Cheung MM1, DeLuccia R2, Ramadoss RK3, Aljahdali A4, Volpe SL5, Shewokis PA6, Sukumar D7.

  • 1 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: mmc372 at drexel.edu.
  • 2 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: rkd44 at drexel.edu.
  • 3 Department of Culinary Arts and Food Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: rr627 at drexel.edu.
  • 4 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: aaoaljahdali1 at kau.edu.sa.
  • 5 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: slv43 at drexel.edu.
  • 6 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health System, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: pas38 at drexel.edu.
  • 7 Department of Nutrition Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, 1601 Cherry St., Philadelphia, PA 19102. Electronic address: ds3235 at drexel.edu.


Vitamin D metabolism is dependent on magnesium (Mg) as a cofactor; therefore, poor Mg status may alter the relationship between vitamin D metabolite serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s25OHD) and serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH). We hypothesized that low dietary Mg intake may alter sPTH response to s25OHD in a population with excess body weight, thereby leading to a worsening of cardiometabolic health. To explore this hypothesis, we conducted a cross-sectional study on adults who were either overweight or obese (owt/ob). Dietary Mg intake was measured using a Mg food frequency questionnaire (MgFFQ). Body composition information was measured using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). Blood samples were obtained for all biochemical analyses. A total of 57 participants, 22 to 65 years of age, with a body mass index between 25 to 45 kg/m2 were divided into 3 groups, according to dietary Mg intake percentiles (Low Mg Group = <33 percentile, Medium Mg Group = 33 to 66 percentile, High Mg Group = >66 percentile). Higher s25OHD was negatively associated with lower sPTH in the High Mg Intake group (r = -0.472, P = .041), but not in other groups. A positive relationship between s25OHD and serum high-molecular weight adiponectin concentrations was observed in the High Mg Group (r = 0.532, r = 0.022), but not in other groups. Serum Interleukin-6 concentrations were negatively associated with s25OHD (r = -0.316, P = .017) for the entire study group. Based on these results, our study demonstrated that a low dietary Mg intake may alter PTH response to 25OHD.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Friday November 8, 2019 23:02:41 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 3)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
12934 Low Mg PTH Obese Sci-hub.pdf PDF 2019 admin 08 Nov, 2019 22:51 407.71 Kb 16
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