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  1. Anorexia is associated with low vitamin D at birth
  2. Gallstones 33 percent more likely if born during winter – Dec 2016
  3. Is the variation in winter babies due to vitamin D – 2009
  4. October Babies more likely to be successful, live longer, etc (Vitamin D, etc) Oct 2019
  5. Environmental risk factors for MS include latitude and vitamin D – Sept 2012
  6. Hypothesis: Low vitamin D linked to Myopia
  7. Hypothesis- birth rate variation with season may trump MS variation with vitamin D – Jan 2014
  8. Odds of living to 100 increase by 40 percent if had been born in the fall – 2011
  9. Season of Birth
  10. Season of birth (Vitamin D) vs birth weight, puberty, body size, etc. – Oct 2015
  11. 7 percent less likely to get immune mediated disease if born in the fall – July 2012
  12. Association between season of birth and suicide – perhaps vitamin D – Sept 2012
  13. Autoimmune Addison's Disease – increased risk if born in Dec or Jan – Nov 2016
  14. Diseases correlated to month of birth – 2008
  15. Health problems are related to birth month - June 2015
  16. UV at time of conception associated with Vitamin D Receptor activation 65 years later – Sept 2017
  17. Conception in winter increases rate of Autism, learning disabilities, dyslexia – Oct 2016
  18. Multiple Sclerosis 23 percent more likely if born in April vs. Oct – meta-analysis Nov 2012
  19. Season of birth associated with pneumonia (10 pcnt) and multiple sclerosis (30 pcnt) – May 2013
  20. Little sun in first trimester, 2.9 X more likely to have learning disabilities – June 2019
  21. Schizophrenia increased 40 percent for Spring births after Danes stopped vitamin D fortification – April 2014

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