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Multiple Sclerosis varies with latitude while young – March 2021

The latitude gradient for multiple sclerosis prevalence is established in the early lifecourse

Brain, awab104, https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awab104
Clive E Sabel, John F Pearson, Deborah F Mason, Ernest Willoughby, David A Abernethy, Bruce V Taylor

Relapsing MS for females who lived in at a latitude before age 12
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Latitudes of New Zealand if NZ were in Europe or the US


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VitaminDWiki

Summary: Children who had higher levels of vitamin D (from UV in this case) are less likely to develope MS

Overview MS and vitamin D contains the following summary

Clinical interventions have shown that Vitamin D can prevent, treat, and even cure Multiple Sclerosis, at a tiny fraction of the cost of the drugs now used to treat it, and without side effects.

Summary: lack of consensus on how much to prevent, treat, or cure MS.

  • How much Vitamin D to prevent many diseases - such as MS
  • How much Vitamin D is needed to treat MS? There is currently no agreement
       The recommendations range from 40 to 100 ng - which can result of a dose ranging from 3,000 to 20,000 IU/day
  • How Vitamin D is needed to Cure MS?: It appears that 20,000-140,000 IU daily may be needed to CURE the disease
       You must be under the supervision of a doctor who knows what to watch for in your individual situation.
       High doses of Vitamin D cannot be used as a monotherapy.
       You will need to adjust the cofactors: Typically increasing Magnesium and Vitamin K2, and reducing Calcium intake.
       Your doctor will monitor these and might increase your intake of Vitamins B2, C, as well as Omega-3

Multiple Sclerosis 32 percent less likely among those with more than 32 ng of vitamin D – Dec 2019

UV and Sunshine reduces MS risk

Other things also help

High Dose Vitamin D and cofactors

Number of MS studies which are also in other categories

  • 20 studies in Genetics - genes can restrict Vitamin D getting to the blood and to the cells
  • 11 studies in Vitamin D Receptor - gene which restricts D from getting to the cells
  • 5 studies in Vitamin D Binding Protein - gene which restricts D from getting to the cells
  • 19 studies in Ultraviolet light - may be even better than Vitamin D in preventing and treating MS
  • 9 studies in Omega-3 - which helps Vitamin D prevent and treat MS

 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki

The strongest epidemiological clue that the environment at the population level has a significant impact on the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is the well-established, and in many instances, increasing latitudinal gradient of prevalence, incidence and mortality globally, with prevalence increasing by up to 10-fold between the equator and 60 degrees North and South. The drivers of this gradient are thought to be environmental with latitude seen as a proxy for ultraviolet radiation and thus vitamin D production, however other factors may also play a role. However several important questions remain unanswered, particularly when in the life course is the gradient established, does lifetime migration mitigate or exacerbate previously reported latitude gradients at location of diagnosis, and do factors such as sex or MS disease phenotype influence the timing or significance of the gradient?

Utilising life time residence calendars collected as part of the New Zealand national MS prevalence study, we constructed lifetime latitudinal gradients for MS from birth to prevalence day 2006 taking into account migration internally and externally and then analysed by sex and MS clinical course phenotype. 2127 of 2917 people living in NZ on prevalence day 7 March 2006 with MS completed the life course questionnaire and of these 1587 were born in NZ. All cohorts and sub cohorts were representative of the overall MS population in NZ on prevalence day.

We found that the prevalence gradient was present at birth and was in fact stronger than at census day, and the slope of the gradient persisted until the age of 12 before gradually declining. We found that internal and external migration into NZ had little if any effect on the gradient except to decrease the significance of the gradient somewhat. Finally, we found as we had reported previously that the lifetime prevalence gradients were largely driven by females with relapse onset MS.

These findings confirm for the first time the importance of early life environmental exposures in the risk of MS indicating strongly that exposures as early as in utero and at birth drive the latitudinal gradient. Consequently, prevention studies should be focussed on high risk individuals and populations from the earliest possible time points especially, when appropriate, on females.


Created by admin. Last Modification: Friday March 12, 2021 17:07:49 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 8)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
15240 NZ US.jpg admin 12 Mar, 2021 16:01 12.35 Kb 18
15239 NZ Europe.jpg admin 12 Mar, 2021 16:01 18.33 Kb 19
15238 Female MS relapsing NZ.jpg admin 12 Mar, 2021 15:47 79.07 Kb 17
15237 MS latitude under age 12 New Zesland.pdf PDF 2021 admin 12 Mar, 2021 15:46 1.88 Mb 13
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