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Multiple Sclerosis 60 percent less likely in those with more than 40 ng of vitamin D – 2006

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and risk of multiple sclerosis.

JAMA. 2006 Dec 20;296(23):2832-8.
Munger KL1, Levin LI, Hollis BW, Howard NS, Ascherio A.
1Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, and Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass 02115, USA.
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Overview MS and vitamin D contains the following summary
Clinical interventions have shown that Vitamin D can prevent, treat, and even cure Multiple Sclerosis, at a tiny fraction of the cost of the drugs now used to treat it, and without side effects.

Summary: lack of consensus on how much to prevent, treat, or cure MS.

  • How much Vitamin D to prevent many diseases - such as MS
  • How much Vitamin D is needed to treat MS? There is currently no agreement
       The recommendations range from 40 to 100 ng - which can result of a dose ranging from 3,000 to 20,000 IU/day
  • How Vitamin D is needed to Cure MS?: It appears that 20,000-140,000 IU daily may be needed to CURE the disease
       You must be under the supervision of a doctor who knows what to watch for in your individual situation.
       High doses of Vitamin D cannot be used as a monotherapy.
       You will need to adjust the cofactors: Typically increasing Magnesium and Vitamin K2, and reducing Calcium intake.
       Your doctor will monitor these and might increase your intake of Vitamins B2, C, as well as Omega-3


Multiple Sclerosis and (lots of) Vitamin D - book by patient on Coimbra protocol - Feb 2016 contains protocol description
Vitamin D Protocol used by Dr. Coimbra for Multiple Sclerosis etc.
Snips as of April 2016 http://www.vitamindprotocol.com/dr.-coimbra-s-ms-protocol.html

  • 1,000 IU's vitamin D per kilogram as a first approximation
    (apparently increased/decreased depending of resulting vitamin D blood level)
  • Vitamin B2, magnesium glycinate, boron, chromium picolinate, Omega 3 DHA, Zinc, Methylcobalamin form of B12, Choline, etc.
  • Lack of B12 may affect 10%–15% of the general population and may be the most prevalent genetic risk factor for several human diseases
  • Discontinue eating or drinking dairy products or calcium enriched foods or beverages, also no Ca supplements
  • Drink as least 2.5 liters [85 ounces] of fluids, preferably water
  • Required Tests:​ Vitamin D, Parathyroid, Blood calcium, urinary calcium

 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki

CONTEXT:
Epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that high levels of vitamin D, a potent immunomodulator, may decrease the risk of multiple sclerosis. There are no prospective studies addressing this hypothesis.
OBJECTIVE:
To examine whether levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with risk of multiple sclerosis.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:
Prospective, nested case-control study among more than 7 million US military personnel who have serum samples stored in the Department of Defense Serum Repository. Multiple sclerosis cases were identified through Army and Navy physical disability databases for 1992 through 2004, and diagnoses were confirmed by medical record review. Each case (n = 257) was matched to 2 controls by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and dates of blood collection. Vitamin D status was estimated by averaging 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 2 or more serum samples collected before the date of initial multiple sclerosis symptoms.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Odds ratios of multiple sclerosis associated with continuous or categorical levels (quantiles or a priori-defined categories) of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D within each racial/ethnic group.
RESULTS:
Among whites (148 cases, 296 controls), the risk of multiple sclerosis significantly decreased with increasing levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (odds ratio OR for a 50-nmol/L increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.97). In categorical analyses using the lowest quintile (<63.3 nmol/L) as the reference, the ORs for each subsequent quintile were 0.57, 0.57, 0.74, and 0.38 (P = .02 for trend across quintiles).
Only the OR for the highest quintile, corresponding to 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels higher than 99.1 nmol/L, was significantly different from 1.00 (OR, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.75; P = .006).
The inverse relation with multiple sclerosis risk was particularly strong for 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels measured before age 20 years. Among blacks and Hispanics (109 cases, 218 controls), who had lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels than whites, no significant associations between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis risk were found.
CONCLUSION:
The results of our study suggest that high circulating levels of vitamin D are associated with a lower risk of multiple sclerosis.
PMID: 17179460

Attached files

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6770 MS2006.jpg admin 10 Jun, 2016 22:40 23.59 Kb 410
6769 MS 2006.pdf PDF admin 10 Jun, 2016 22:40 124.13 Kb 402
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