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Intervention of 400 IU of vitamin D raised infant blood levels 14 ng – Jan 2012

Effects of ethnicity and vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D status and changes in bone mineral content in infants.

BMC Pediatr. 2012 Jan 16;12:6.
Abrams SA, Hawthorne KM, Rogers SP, Hicks PD, Carpenter TO.
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. sabrams at bcm.edu

BACKGROUND:

To evaluate the effects on serum 25(OH)D and bone mineralization of supplementation of breast-fed Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian infants with vitamin D in infants in Houston, Texas.
METHODS:

We measured cord serum 25(OH)D levels, bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD) and their changes over 3 months of life with 400 IU/day of vitamin D3 supplementation.
RESULTS:

Cord serum 25(OH)D was significantly lower in Hispanic than non-Hispanic Caucasian infants (16.4 ± 6.5 ng/mL, n = 27, vs 22.3 ± 9.4 n = 22, p = 0.013). Among 38 infants who completed a 3 month vitamin D supplementation intervention, provision of 400 IU/day of vitamin D increased final 25(OH)D to a higher level in non-Hispanic Caucasian compared to Hispanic infants. There was no significant relationship between cord serum 25(OH)D and BMC or BMD in the first week of life (n = 49) or after 3 months of vitamin D supplementation.
CONCLUSION:

Low cord 25(OH)D levels are seen in Hispanic infants, but their functional significance is uncertain related to bone health in a southern US setting. Daily vitamin D intake of 400 IU during the first months of life appears adequate to increase serum 25(OH)D and support BMC increases despite low initial 25(OH)D levels in some infants.
TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClincalTrials.gov NCT00697294.
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Summary

Caucasian Before 23 ng, after 38 ng, change 15 ng
Hispanic Before 17 ng, after 31 ng, change 14 ng
It appears that both increased a similar amount
Had started from and reached different levels.

We assume that breast milk provided little vitamin D

Perhaps the reason for low increase in Bone Mineral Content was that the infants lacked co-factors of vitamin D needed to build bones

Magnesium, vitamin K2, Boron, Strontium, Zinc, Silicon

PDF is attached at the bottom of this page

See also VitaminDWiki

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
1150 400 IU 14 ng.pdf PDF admin 16 Mar, 2012 12:50 838.89 Kb 627
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