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Canadian Vitamin D deficiency – May 2011

The vitamin D status of Canadians relative to the 2011 Dietary Reference Intakes: an examination in children and adults with and without supplement use.


Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 May 18.
Whiting SJ, Langlois KA, Vatanparast H, Greene-Finestone LS.
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.

BACKGROUND:
The 2011 Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for vitamin D use 25-hydroxyvitamin D 25(OH)D concentrations to define vitamin D deficiency (<30 nmol/L), the Estimated Average Requirement (40 nmol/L), and the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA; 50 nmol/L). The Canadian population has not yet been assessed according to these recommendations.

OBJECTIVE:
We determined the prevalence of meeting DRI recommendations and the role of vitamin D supplement use among Canadians aged 6-79 y.

DESIGN:
Plasma 25(OH)D from a representative sample of Canadians in the Canadian Health Measures Survey-Cycle 1 (n = 5306) were used. Supplement use was assessed by household interview. Concentrations of 25(OH)D were compared in supplement users and nonusers by season and race.

RESULTS:
Overall, 5.4%, 12.7%, and 25.7% of the participants had 25(OH)D concentrations below the 30-, 40-, and 50-nmol/L cutoffs, respectively. In white Canadians, plasma 25(OH)D concentrations ranged from an undetectable percentage with concentrations <30 nmol/L in summer to 24.5% with concentrations <50 nmol/L in winter;

the corresponding values ranged from 12.5% to 53.1% in nonwhite Canadians.

Supplement users had significantly higher 25(OH)D concentrations than did nonusers, and no seasonal differences were found. In nonsupplement users, the prevalence of 25(OH)D concentrations <50 nmol/L in winter was 37.2% overall and was 60.7% in nonwhites.

CONCLUSIONS:
One-quarter of Canadians did not meet the RDA, but the use of vitamin D supplements contributed to a better 25(OH)D status.

Nonwhite Canadians had the highest risk of not achieving DRI recommendations.

More than one-third of Canadians not using supplements did not meet the RDA in winter.
This suggests that current food choices alone are insufficient to maintain 25(OH)D concentrations of 50 nmol/L in many Canadians, especially in winter.
PMID: 21593503

CLICK HERE for pdf


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In ng/ml

  • < 12 ng 5%
  • < 16 ng 13%
  • < 20 ng 26%
    • non supplement whites in winter 37%
    • non-supplement nonwhites in winter 61%

Portions of 2 charts in the paper

Image

Image

See also VitaminDWiki

Image

CLICK HERE for chart details

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
553 Canadian winter.jpg Winter admin 03 Jun, 2011 12:18 44.87 Kb 1269
552 Canadian all-year.jpg All Year admin 03 Jun, 2011 12:18 30.07 Kb 1092
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