Loading...
 
Toggle Health Problems and D

Low UVB countries have higher leukemia rates – July 2011

Ultraviolet B and Incidence Rates of Leukemia Worldwide

American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume 41, Issue 1, July 2011, Pages 68-74
Sharif B. Mohr MPHa, Cedric F. Garland DrPHa, b, Corresponding Author, Edward D. Gorham PhDa, b, William B. Grant PhDd and Frank C. Garland DrPHa, c, low asterisk

  • a Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California
  • b Department of Health Sciences and Epidemiology, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California
  • c Office of the Technical Director, Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California
  • d Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center, San Francisco, California

Background: Recent research has suggested a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and risk of leukemia.

Purpose: Using data from the UN cancer database, GLOBOCAN, this study will determine whether a relationship exists for latitude and ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance with incidence rates of leukemia in 175 countries.

Methods: Multiple regression was used to analyze the independent association between UVB and age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia in 139 countries in 2002. This study controlled for dietary data on intake of energy from animal sources and per capita healthcare expenditures. The analyses were performed in 2009.

Results: People residing in the highest-latitude countries had the highest rates of leukemia in both men (R2=0.34, p<0.0001) and women (R2=0.24, p<0.0001). In men, UVB was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p?0.001), whereas animal energy consumption (p=0.02) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p?0.0001) were independently positively associated (R2 for model=0.61, p?0.0001). In women, UVB adjusted for cloud cover was independently inversely associated with leukemia incidence rates (p?0.01), whereas animal energy consumption (p?0.05) and per capita healthcare expenditures (p=0.0002) were independently positively associated (R2 for model=0.51, p<0.0001).

Conclusions: Countries with low UVB had higher age-adjusted incidence rates of leukemia. This suggests the possibility that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status, because of lower levels of UVB, somehow might predict the development of leukemia.
Image
- - - - - - - - - - -

See also VitaminDWiki

Less Leukemia if more UVB (VDW #7157)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
778 Leukemia - women.png Smile graph - women admin 27 Sep, 2011 20:43 148.74 Kb 2535
See any problem with this page? Report it (FINALLY WORKS)