Loading...
 
Translate Register Log In Login with facebookLogin and Register

Autism 1.75X more likely if BOTH maternal and infant vitamin D levels were low – Nov 2019

Developmental vitamin D and autism spectrum disorders: findings from the Stockholm Youth Cohort.

Mol Psychiatry. 2019 Nov 6. doi: 10.1038/s41380-019-0578-y
Lee BK1,2,3, Eyles DW4,5, Magnusson C6, Newschaffer CJ7,8, McGrath JJ4,5,9, Kvaskoff D4, Ko P4,5, Dalman C6, Karlsson H10, Gardner RM6.

VitaminDWiki

No such attachment on this page

Animal studies indicate that early life vitamin D is crucial for proper neurodevelopment. Few studies have examined whether maternal and neonatal vitamin D concentrations influence risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Participants were sampled from the Stockholm Youth Cohort, a register-based cohort in Sweden. Concentrations of total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) were assessed from maternal and neonatal biosamples using a highly sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method.
The maternal sample consisted of 449 ASD cases and 574 controls, the neonatal sample: 1399 ASD cases and 1607 controls; and the paired maternal-neonatal sample: 340 ASD cases and 426 controls.
Maternal 25OHD was not associated with child ASD in the overall sample. However, in Nordic-born mothers, maternal 25OHD insufficiency (25 - <50 nmol/L) at ~11 weeks gestation was associated with 1.58 times higher odds of ASD (95% CI: 1.00, 2.49) as compared with 25OHD sufficiency (≥50 nmol/L).
Neonatal 25OHD < 25 nmol/L was associated with 1.33 times higher odds of ASD (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75) as compared with 25OHD ≥ 50 nmol/L.
Sibling-matched control analyses indicated these associations were not likely due to familial confounding.
Children with both maternal 25OHD and neonatal 25OHD below the median had 1.75 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.86) times the odds of ASD compared with children with maternal and neonatal 25OHD both below the median. Our results are consistent with an increasing body of evidence suggesting that vitamin D concentrations in early life may be associated with increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders including ASD.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Thursday November 7, 2019 22:47:16 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 1)
See any problem with this page? Report it (FINALLY WORKS)