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Depressed black pregnant women should take vitamin D – April 2018

Vitamin D deficiency and depressive symptoms in pregnancy are associated with adverse perinatal outcomes.

J Behav Med. 2018 Apr 18. doi: 10.1007/s10865-018-9924-9. [Epub ahead of print]

VitaminDWiki

The articles in Pregnancy AND Depression are here:


Accortt EE1, Lamb A2, Mirocha J3, Hobel CJ4.

  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Eynav.accortt at cshs.org.
  • 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 3 Cedars-Sinai Biostatistics Core, Research Institute, Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC), Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Calvin.Hobel at cshs.org.

Prenatal vitamin D deficiency and prenatal depression are both separately associated with adverse perinatal outcomes; however, to our knowledge no studies have investigated the effects of having both risk factors. Our objective was to determine to what extent vitamin D deficiency predicts adverse perinatal outcomes and whether elevated depressive symptoms in pregnancy places women at additional increased risk. This study was a secondary data analysis of prospective data collected from a cohort of pregnant women (N = 101) in an obstetric clinic of a large medical center. Maternal vitamin D deficiency (serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml) and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, EPDS) were assessed in early pregnancy. A composite of four adverse perinatal outcomes (low birth weight, preterm birth, small-for-gestational age, and preeclampsia) were abstracted from medical charts.

Nineteen of the 101 women had one or more adverse perinatal outcome and 84% with an adverse outcome (16/19) were not White. Both prenatal and time of delivery vitamin D deficiency were associated with developing an

  • adverse outcome compared to those vitamin D sufficient (prenatal relative risk 3.43; 95% CI 1.60-7.34, p = 0.004;
  • delivery time relative risk 5.14, 95% CI 2.68-9.86, p = 0.004).

These both remained significant after adjusting for BMI. A higher rate of adverse outcome was found when women had both prenatal vitamin D deficiency and elevated depressive symptoms (EPDS ≥ 10). Sixty percent with both risk factors had an adverse perinatal outcome versus 17% with only one or neither risk factor (relative risk 3.60; 95% CI 1.55-8.38, p = 0.045), worthy of investigation with larger samples.
Together, prenatal vitamin D deficiency and elevated depressive symptoms in pregnancy may increase risk for adverse perinatal outcomes, especially in racial minorities. Obstetric providers should consider routine prenatal depression screening. The impact of vitamin D supplementation to reduce risk for adverse perinatal outcomes should be studied in prospective trials. Our results suggest that supplementation early in pregnancy might be especially beneficial for depressed women.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Saturday April 21, 2018 22:49:26 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 2)
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