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Genes which regulate active vitamin D worsen with age – Oct 2016

Vitamin D, calcium homeostasis and aging.

Bone Res. 2016 Oct 18;4:16041. eCollection 2016.
Veldurthy V1, Wei R1, Oz L1, Dhawan P1, Jeon YH1, Christakos S1.
1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School , Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

VitaminDWiki

Blood tests cannot detect changes in active vitamin D
Invisible Genes: Vitamin D Receptor, GC, CYP27B1, and CYP24A1

See also VitaminDWiki

Genetics category listing contains the following

229 articles in the Genetics category

see also 246 articles in Vitamin D Receptor, 92 articles in Vitamin D Binding Protein

Vitamin D blood test misses a lot
Blood Test Misses a lot (VDW 3439)

  • Snapshot of the literature by VitaminDWiki - (subject to many future developments)
  • Vitamin D from coming from tissues (vs blood) was speculated to be 50% in 2014, andi in 2017 is speculated to be 90%
  • Note: Good results from a blood test (> 40 ng) does not mean that a good amount of Vitamin D actually gets to cells
  • A Vitamin D test in cells appears feasible (personal communication)
    However test results would vary in each tissue due to multiple genes
  • Good clues that Vitamin D is being restricted from getting to the cells
    1) A vitamin D-related health problem runs in the family
       especially if it is one of 47+ diseases related to Vitamin D Receptor
    2) Slightly increasing Vitamin D show benefits (even if conventional Vitamin D test shows an increase)
    3) Vitamin D Receptor test (<$30) scores are difficult to understand in 2016
        easier to understand the VDR 23andMe test results analyzed by FoundMyFitness in 2018
    4) Back Pain
        probably want at least 2 clues before taking adding vitamin D, Omega-3, Magnesium, Resveratrol, etc
          The founder of VitaminDWiki took action with clues #3&4

Items in both categories Genetics and Seniors are listed here:

Vitamin D Receptor category has the following

246 items in Vitamin D Receptor category

Vitamin D tests cannot detect Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) problems
A poor VDR restricts Vitamin D from getting in the cells
It appears that 30% of the population has a poor VDR (40% of the Obese )

A poor VDR increases the risk of 40 health problems  click here for details

VDR at-home test $29 - results not easily understood in 2016
There are hints that you may have inherited a poor VDR

Compensate for poor VDR by increasing one or more:

IncreasingIncreases
1) Vitamin D supplement
  Sun, Ultraviolet -B
Vitamin D in the blood
and thus to the cells
2) MagnesiumVitamin D in the blood
 AND to the cells
3) Omega-3 Vitamin D to the cells
4) Resveratrol Vitamin D to the cells
5) Intense exercise Vitamin D Receptor
6) Get prescription for VDR activator
   paricalcitol, maxacalcitol?
Vitamin D Receptor
7) Quercetin (flavonoid) Vitamin D Receptor
8) Zinc is in the VDRVitamin D Receptor
9) BoronVitamin D Receptor, etc
10) Essential oils e.g. ginger, curcuminVitamin D Receptor

Note: If you are not feeling enough benefit from Vitamin D, you might try increasing VDR activation.
You might feel the benefit within days of adding one or more of the above

Far healthier and stronger at age 72 due to supplements Includes 6 supplements which help the VDR

10 reasons why seniors need more vitamin D has the following

  1. Senior skin produces 3X less Vitamin D for the same sun intensity
  2. Seniors have fewer vitamin D receptors as they age
    (The effect of low Vitamin D receptor genes does not show up on vitamin D test results)
  3. Seniors are indoors more than when when they were younger
    not as agile, weaker muscles; frail, no longer enjoy hot temperatures
    (if outside, stay in the shade), however, seniors might start outdoor activities like gardening, biking, etc.
  4. Seniors wear more clothing outdoors than when younger
    fear skin cancer/wrinkles, sometimes avoid bright light after cataract surgery
  5. Seniors often take various drugs which reduce vitamin D (some would not show up on vitamin D test)
    statins, chemotherapy, anti-depressants, blood pressure, beta-blockers, etc
  6. Seniors often have one or more diseases which consume vitamin D ( osteoporosis, diabetes, MS, ...)
  7. Seniors generally put on weight at they age - and a heavier body requires more vitamin D
  8. Seniors often (40%) have fatty livers – which do not process vitamin D as well
  9. Seniors not have as much Magnesium needed to use vitamin D
    (would not show up on vitamin D test)
  10. Seniors with poorly functioning kidneys do not process vitamin D as well
    (would not show up on vitamin D test)
    2009 full text online  Also PDF 2009
  11. Vitamin D is not as bioavailable in senior digestive systems (Stomach acid or intestines?)

 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki


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Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and consequent increase in fracture risk. Evidence is accumulating for an important role of calcium deficiency as the process of aging is associated with disturbed calcium balance. Vitamin D is the principal factor that maintains calcium homeostasis. Increasing evidence indicates that the reason for disturbed calcium balance with age is inadequate vitamin D levels in the elderly. In this article, an overview of our current understanding of vitamin D, its metabolism, and mechanisms involved in vitamin D-mediated maintenance of calcium homeostasis is presented.
In addition, mechanisms involved in age-related dysregulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 action, recommended daily doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the use of vitamin D analogs for the treatment of osteoporosis (which remains controversial) are reviewed. Elucidation of the molecular pathways of vitamin D action and modifications that occur with aging will be an active area of future research that has the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies to maintain calcium balance.

PMID: 27790378 DOI: 10.1038/boneres.2016.41

Clipped from PDF

  • “We and others have noted that renal CYP24A1, which limits the amount of 1,25 (OH)2D3 by accelerating the catabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3, increases with age.”
  • “In addition, with age there is a defect in 1 α hydroxylation.”
  • . . “there is also an age-related decrease in renal VDR and TRPV5 expression with age,” . .
  • “Some individuals, however, do not respond to vitamin D supplementation with an increase in 25(OH)D. The factors controlling this lack of response are unknown.”

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
7265 Aging VDR F2.jpg admin 30 Oct, 2016 21:12 18.32 Kb 201
7264 Vitamin D, calcium homeostasis and aging.pdf PDF 2016 admin 30 Oct, 2016 21:11 283.72 Kb 197
7263 Aging VDR F1.jpg admin 30 Oct, 2016 21:10 17.07 Kb 218
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