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Cholesterol and vitamin D book - 2009

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652 page April 2009 by a UK Doctor who has lots of professional publications on the topic

Understanding illness and disease

  • The nature of disease
  • Disease patterns in the 18th and 19th centuries
  • The changing pattern of disease in the 20th century
  • The causation of disease and individual susceptibility
  • Possible causes of disease
  • Resistance to infection

Infections and the environment

  • The seasonality of illness
  • Hepatitis, tuberculosis and syphilis
  • Peptic ulcer – a microbial disease
  • Tuberculosis and South Asian ethnicity
  • Lessons from tuberculosis: a multifactorial disease
  • Glasgow: a microcosm of the industrial society
  • Belfast and Toulouse
  • Association as a clue to causation

Vitamin D

  • Rickets and the discovery of vitamin D
  • The biology of vitamin D
  • Tuberculosis and the sun

Part 4 – Coronary heart disease 117

  • 18. The emergence of coronary heart disease and its decline 119
  • 19. The biology of coronary heart disease 131
  • 20. The causation of coronary heart disease 138
  • 21. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease 141
  • 22. Diet and coronary heart disease 149
  • 23. The Leningrad paradox 164

Part 5 – Cholesterol 169

  • 24. Cholesterol and coronary heart disease 171
  • 25. The metabolism of cholesterol 186
  • 26. Seasonal variation of vitamin D and cholesterol 192
  • 27. Cholesterol-lowering therapies 204
  • 28. The Scottish paradox and the actions of statins 216
  • 29. The elderly paradox 224
  • 30. The geography of cholesterol 237

Part 6 – Geography of disease 251

  • 31. Burnley, Colne & Nelson 253
  • 32. The geography of coronary heart disease in the UK 257
  • 33. The geography of coronary heart disease in Europe 270
  • 34. The geography of coronary heart disease in the USA 280
  • 35. The Northern Ireland paradox 284
  • 36. The French paradox and the effect of alcohol 289
  • 37. The geography of agriculture in Europe 298

Part 7 – Sociology of disease 311

  • 38. Socio-economic deprivation and disease 313
  • 39. Two Albanian paradoxes 338
  • 40. The Greek paradox - smoking and coronary heart disease 342
  • 41. Respiratory disease and coronary heart disease 350
  • 42. Infl ammation and coronary heart disease 357
  • 43. Cholesterol and infl ammation 368

Part 8 – Microbes and the heart 377

  • 44. Could coronary heart disease be caused by micro-organisms? 379
  • 45. Chlamydia pneumoniae 385
  • 46. Helicobacter pylori 393
  • 47. Dental health and coronary heart disease 400
  • 48. Infections of the heart 405
  • 49. Koch´s postulates and the concept of proof 408
  • 50. Science works by paradigms 415

Part 9 – Aspects of immunity 421

  • 51. South Asian ethnicity and coronary heart disease 423
  • 52. The spleen and coronary heart disease 431
  • 53. Sex and coronary heart disease 435
  • 54. Immune suppression and coronary heart disease 439
  • 55. Chronic renal failure, vitamin D and coronary heart disease 443

Part 10 – Diabetes, environmental factors, and climate 451

  • 56. Diabetes and vitamin D 453
  • 57. The metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance 462
  • 58. The maternal factor and non-genetic inheritance 476
  • 59. Hepatitis C virus, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome 487
  • 60. Atmospheric pollution and the emergence of coronary heart disease in newly industrialising countries 491
  • 61. The climate of the British Isles 502
  • 62. Model of disease and environment 508

Part 11 – Protection by the sun from cancers and other diseases 513

  • 63. Protection against cancer by vitamin D and sunlight 515
  • 64. Crohn´s disease 539
  • 65. The sun, vitamin D and diseases of the central nervous system 550
  • 66. Rheumatic and auto-immune disorders 561
  • 67. Is the sun dangerous? 567

Part 12 – Epilogue 581

  • 68. Vitamin D and statins 583
  • References 593

His summary of a 2008 paper on lack of vitamin D in the UK

Video May 2011 following are a few of the charts

Horizontal axis = individual patient - sorted by vitamin D level: clearly low vitamin D associated with each disease


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His website - checked Nov 2014

His comment on Statins June 2010

Statins, cholesterol and vitamin D
It is well known that medications called statins reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood. This is the reason for which millions of people take them, and this is their only licensed use. There are however several anomalies.

First, statins are of equal value to people with low levels of cholesterol in the blood as to those with high levels. Second, the benefit is the same no matter the amount by which the blood level of cholesterol is reduced. These facts immediately suggest that the undoubted, and greater than expected, value of statins might be due to a property other than their ability to reduce cholesterol.

Statins have a very specific metabolic effect in the inhibition of an enzyme called HMG-CoA reductase. True as this undoubtedly is, statins also have other metabolic effects, the nature of which are unknown or unpublished.

The unexpected published benefits of statins include the following:
* Reduced incidence of new diabetes
* Reduced rejection rate after kidney and heart transplantation
* Reduced incidence of colon, lung and prostate cancers
* Improvement of multiple sclerosis
* Improvement of rheumatoid arthritis
* Increased bone density of post-menopausal women
* Improvement of heart failure
* Reduction of the incidence of infections
* Increase in stem cell production in the heart
* Improvement in tissue repair
* Reduction of blood pressure
* Anti-inflammatory effects and reduction of TNFµ (inflammatory mediator)
* Enhancement of immunity
We are accustomed to drugs having unforeseen and undesirable side-effects, but it is most unusual, even unprecedented, for a drug to have such a wide range of unexpected beneficial effects. They are clearly doing something fundamental to the body, something that has nothing whatsoever to do with cholesterol lowering.

It is as though statins are a vitamin, as clearly they have a vitamin-like beneficial effect. Are they somehow a new hitherto undiscovered vitamin? Or are they mimicking a known vitamin? If so, which vitamin is it?

The wide range of benefits is very similar to the known effects of vitamin D. It would therefore appear that statins are acting like vitamin D, activating vitamin D receptors in the body.
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See also at VitaminDWiki

Attached files

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4557 Anaemia - Grimes.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2014 17:45 17.77 Kb 4086
4556 Abdominal pain - Grimes.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2014 17:45 16.77 Kb 798
4555 COPD Grimes.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2014 17:45 15.41 Kb 914
4554 Grimes HBV.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2014 17:44 16.34 Kb 1411
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