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Vitamin D2 from cooked mushroom added virtually no vitamin D to bloodstream - RCT July 2015

Bioavailability of vitamin D2 from enriched mushrooms in prediabetic adults: a randomized controlled trial.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct;68(10):1154-60. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2014.157. Epub 2014 Aug 13.
Mehrotra A1, Calvo MS2, Beelman RB3, Levy E1, Siuty J1, Kalaras MD3, Uribarri J1.
1Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
2Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA, Laurel, MD, USA.
3Department of Food Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:
Based on the growing evidence of risk reduction from fresh fruit and vegetable consumption and an inverse relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we determined the benefits of regularly consuming vitamin D-enriched mushrooms in a prediabetic cohort. Exposing edible mushrooms to ultraviolet B (UVB) light increases vitamin D2 (D2) and raises serum 25OHD2 in healthy young adults; however, their benefit to deficient prediabetics and glucose metabolism remains untested.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:
Forty-three prediabetic, D-deficient adults (25OHD≤20 ng/ml), BMI>25 were randomized to four groups consuming daily entrées containing 100 g fresh sliced cooked mushrooms prepared by a chef for 16 weeks. Two groups were fed UVB-treated mushrooms initially containing: 600 IU D2 or 4000 IU D2; each one also received one capsule of placebo daily. Two control groups were fed untreated mushrooms and D3 dietary supplements at two label doses: 600 IU D3 and 4000 IU D3. D2 and D3 content were analyzed in mushrooms, before and after cooking and in over-the-counter supplements.

RESULTS:
After 16 weeks, both D2-UVB-mushroom entrée doses, which were significantly lower after cooking, produced modest or no increases in 25OHD2 or total 25OHD relative to the positive control subjects who actually consumed about 1242 and 7320 IU per day of D3 (higher than stated on the label).

CONCLUSIONS:
Unanticipated D2 cooking loss from fresh UVB mushrooms and probable low absorption and/or hydroxylation may explain the smaller increase in 25OHD2 in our prediabetic overweight/obese cohort compared with past findings in younger, healthy subjects. Moreover, no dose or vitamin D source was associated with modifying T2D risk factors.

PMID: 25117997


See also VitaminDWiki

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