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Silica exposure (on the job) reduces vitamin D levels (abstract does not say how much) – Jan 2016

Evaluation of bone mineral density and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in subjects with silica exposure.

Environ Health Prev Med. 2016 Jan 29. [Epub ahead of print]
Yıldızgören MT1, Öziş TN2, Baki AE3, Tutkun E4, Yılmaz H4, Tiftik T5, Ekiz T5, Özgirgin N5.
1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara Occupational Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. ftr.mustafaturgut at hotmail.com.
2Department of Chest Diseases, Ankara Occupational Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara Occupational Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
4Department of Toxicology, Ankara Occupational Diseases Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ankara Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

OBJECTIVE:
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in patients with silica exposure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
The study included 104 male subjects with silica exposure and 36 healthy subjects. Posterior-anterior radiographs were classified according to the International Labour Office (ILO) Classification. Category 0 patients were classified as Group I (n = 54), category I patients were classified as Group II (n = 25), Category II and III patients were classified as Group III (n = 25).

RESULTS:
Femoral neck BMD values were significantly lower in Group III (p = 0.007). Lumbar vertebrae BMD values were significantly lower in all groups with silica exposure than in the control group (p = 0.000). The osteoporosis rate was significantly higher in Group III (p = 0.000). Subjects with silica exposure were determined to have diminished 25(OH)D levels (p = 0.012).

CONCLUSION:
The results of this study demonstrated that subjects with silica exposure have diminished BMD and 25(OH)D levels.

PMID: 26825971

Publisher wants $40 for the PDF


From Wikipedia
Silicosis (previously miner's phthisis, grinder's asthma, potter's rot and other occupation-related names)1 is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust, and is marked by inflammation and scarring in the form of nodular lesions in the upper lobes of the lungs. It is a type of pneumoconiosis

See also VitaminDWiki

VitaminDWiki observation
It appears that vitamin D is used up when the body tries to overcome the irritation from on-the job silica,
This is similar to vitamin D being consumed by irritation from smoking, and many diseases

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