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Cesarean section 60 percent increased if low vitamin D – Sept 2015

A Case Control Study to Evaluate the Association between Primary Cesarean Section for Dystocia and Vitamin D Deficiency

Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research 2015 | September | V 9 | #9 | Page : QC05 - QC08
Ajit Sebastian, Reeta Vijayaselvi, Yohen Nandeibam, Madhupriya Natarajan, Thomas Vizhalil Paul, B.Antonisamy, Jiji Elizabeth Mathews coronistrial at yahoo.co.in
1. Registrar, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 2. Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 3. Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 4. Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 5. Professor, Department of Endocrinology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 6. Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. 7. Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit V, Christian Medical College, Ida Scudder Road, Vellore, South India.

Background: Milder forms of vitamin D deficiency could be responsible for poor muscular performance causing dysfunctional labor. The aim of our research was to study the association between vitamin D deficiency and primary cesarean section.

Materials and Methods: This was a case control study. Forty six women who delivered by primary cesarean section with dystocia as primary or secondary indication after 37 weeks of gestation were taken as cases and a similar number of women who delivered vaginally were taken as controls. Vitamin D deficiency was diagnosed when the serum 25(OH)D level was =20 ng/ml and this was compared between cases and controls.

Results: Median serum (OH) vitamin D levels was 23.3ng/ml among women who delivered by cesarean section and 26.2ng/ ml among controls (p=0.196). Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups except for a strong association between Body Mass Index (BMI) and cesarean section, (29.7kg/m2 in cases and 25.9kg/m2 in controls p=0.001) seen in multivariate analysis. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 34.8% of cases and 21.7% of controls (p=0.165).

Conclusion: This small case control study did not show a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and primary cesarean section.

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IU Cumulative Benefit Blood level CofactorsCalcium $*/month
200 Better bones for mom
with 600 mg of Calcium
6 ng/ml increase Not needed No effect $0.10
400 Less Rickets (but not zero with 400 IU)
3X less adolescent Schizophrenia
Fewer child seizures
20-30 ng/ml Not needed No effect $0.20
2000 2X More likely to get pregnant naturally/IVF
2X Fewer dental problems with pregnancy
8X less diabetes
4X fewer C-sections (>37 ng)
4X less preeclampsia (40 ng vs 10 ng)
5X less child asthma
2X fewer language problems age 5
42 ng/ml Desirable < 750 mg $1
4000 2X fewer pregnancy complications
2X fewer pre-term births
49 ng/ml Should have
cofactors
< 750 mg $3
6000 Probable: larger benefits for above items
Just enough D for breastfed infant
More maternal and infant weight
Should have
cofactors
< 750 mg $4

c-section OR "caesarean section" 118 items as of Sept 2015

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
5886 Cesarean Section.pdf PDF 2015 admin 05 Sep, 2015 15:13 390.91 Kb 691
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