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World Health Organization considering new pregnancy Vitamin D recommendations - behind paywall Nov 2015

Update WHO recommends zero vitamin D during pregnancy, rest of the world disagrees – Dec 2018
WHO allows 200 IU if the woman has a documented Vitamin D deficiency

Prevention and consequences of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant and lactating women and children: A symposium to prioritise vitamin D on the global agenda

The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Publisher charges $36 for the PDF
Inez Schoenmakersa, , , John M Pettiforb, Juan-Pablo Peña-Rosasc, Christel Lamberg-Allardtd, Nick Shawe, Kerry S Jonesa, Paul Lipsf, Francis H Glorieuxg, Roger Bouillonh
Highlights
•World Health Organization and the Vitamin D Workshop organised a joint symposium.
•Vitamin D deficiency is common in women of child bearing age.
•Causes of nutritional rickets in infants and children include vitamin D and calcium deficiency.
•Diagnostic criteria for nutritional rickets in infants and children were identified.
•Strategies to prioritise research needs and implement nutritional policies were discussed.

The Department of Nutrition for Health and Development of the World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration with the Executive Committee of the 18th Vitamin D Workshop (VDW), organised a joint symposium on the prevention and consequences of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and children, convening experts on vitamin D, clinicians and policy-makers. The overall aim was to identify priority areas for research and to discuss the need for global options for policy, with a focus on the prevention of rickets in infants and children and vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women.

The scope and purpose were

  • (i) to present the WHO research strategy for health, addressing vitamin D-related public health problems and the process for the development of evidence-informed guidelines in general and how vitamin D interventions in diverse populations could be prioritised;
  • (ii) to provide an overview of vitamin D status in children and pregnant and lactating women across the world;
  • (iii) to review the health risks associated with vitamin D deficiency in children and in pregnant women and their offspring;
  • (iv) to understand the aetiology of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and children
  • (v) to identify and interpret biomarkers to assess vitamin D status and to consider possible clinical and biochemical screening tools for determining the prevalence of nutritional rickets in at risk groups or communities; and
  • (vi) to provide an overview of policies and recommendations on vitamin D across the world.

The format of the symposium was a composite of comprehensive scientific presentations and a panel debate with international experts on WHO guidelines, nutritional rickets, nutritional policy and consequences of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy. This paper summarizes the content and outcomes of the panel debate.


See also VitaminDWiki

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