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Vitamin D does not help gain muscle mass (when only use small doses) – March 2019

Do multi-ingredient protein supplements augment resistance training-induced gains in skeletal muscle mass and strength? A systematic review and meta-analysis of 35 trials.

Br J Sports Med. 2019 Mar 1. pii: bjsports-2018-099889. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099889.
O'Bryan KR1, Doering TM1, Morton RW2, Coffey VG1, Phillips SM2, Cox GR1.

VitaminDWiki

Only suspect that only low vitamin D was used.in the trials - this meta-analysis does not indicate how much
Have not had the time to check each of the RCTs to see the amount of vitamin D used


Overview Sports and vitamin D has the following summary

Athletes are helped by vitamin D by:

  1. Faster reaction time
  2. Far fewer colds/flus during the winter
  3. Less sore/tired after a workout
  4. Fewer micro-cracks and broken bones
  5. Bones which do break heal much more quickly
  6. Increased VO2 and exercise endurance Feb 2011
  7. Indoor athletes especially need vitamin D
  8. Professional indoor athletes are starting to supplement with vitamin D or use vitamin D beds
  9. Olympic athletes have used UV/vitamin D since the 1930's
  10. The biggest gain from the use of vitamin D is by those who exercise less than 2 hours per day.
  11. Reduced muscle fatigue with 10,000 IU vitamin D daily
  12. Muscle strength improved when vitamin D added: 3 Meta-analysis

RCTs which may have included some amount of Vitamin D

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 Download the PDF from Sci-Hub via VitaminDWiki

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of multi-ingredient protein (MIP) supplements on resistance exercise training (RT)-induced gains in muscle mass and strength compared with protein-only (PRO) or placebo supplementation.

DATA SOURCES: Systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials with interventions including RT ≥6 weeks in duration and a MIP supplement.

DESIGN:
Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to determine the effect of supplementation on fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass, one-repetition maximum (1RM) upper body and 1RM lower body muscular strength. Subgroup analyses compared the efficacy of MIP supplementation relative to training status and chronological age.

RESULTS:
The most common MIP supplements included protein with creatine (n=17) or vitamin D (n=10). Data from 35 trials with 1387 participants showed significant (p<0.05) increases in FFM (0.80 kg (95% CI 0.44 to 1.15)), 1RM lower body (4.22 kg (95% CI 0.79 to 7.64)) and 1RM upper body (2.56 kg (95% CI 0.79 to 4.33)) where a supplement was compared with all non-MIP supplemented conditions (means (95% CI)). Subgroup analyses indicated a greater effect of MIP supplements compared with all non-MIP supplements on FFM in untrained (0.95 kg (95% CI 0.51 to 1.39), p<0.0001) and older participants (0.77 kg (95% CI 0.11 to 1.43), p=0.02); taking MIP supplements was also associated with gains in 1RM upper body (1.56 kg (95% CI 0.80 to 2.33), p=0.01) in older adults.

SUMMARY/CONCLUSIONS:
When MIP supplements were combined with resistance exercise training, there were greater gains in FFM and strength in healthy adults than in counterparts who were supplemented with non-MIP. MIP supplements were not superior when directly compared with PRO supplements. The magnitude of effect of MIP supplements was greater (in absolute values) in untrained and elderly individuals undertaking RT than it was in trained individuals and in younger people.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42017081970.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Sunday March 3, 2019 12:44:33 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 5)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
11507 MIP vs PRO B.jpg admin 03 Mar, 2019 12:41 11.64 Kb 32
11506 MIP vs PRO A.jpg admin 03 Mar, 2019 12:41 13.25 Kb 36
11505 Gain Muscle mass.pdf PDF 2019 admin 03 Mar, 2019 12:16 1.68 Mb 11
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