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Vitamin D deficiency is associated with 35 genes, only 7 of are commercially tested – Nov 2019

Identification and analysis of 35 genes associated with vitamin D deficiency: A systematic review to identify genetic variants.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019 Oct 30:105516. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.105516
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Tiny portion of Figure 4

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VitaminDWiki

The story of the Human Body -excellent book by Daniel Lieberman

  • People with poor immune systems in the 1800's - 20% died before becoming parents.
  • Instead of survival of the fittest (80% survived) we now have survival of the survivors (99% survive)
  • But with better hygiene, antibiotics, vaccines, and medical care there are many more people with poor immune systems survive to become parents.

Many reasons why vitamin D deficiency has become epidemic has a chart updated Oct 2019
http://www.vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=1586
Poor responses to UV and Vitamin D were correlated to just 4 poor genes – June 2019

Genetics category listing contains the following

253 articles in the Genetics category

see also

Vitamin D blood test misses a lot
Blood Test Misses a lot (VDW 3439)

  • Snapshot of the literature by VitaminDWiki as of early 2019
  • Vitamin D from coming from tissues (vs blood) was speculated to be 50% in 2014, andi by 2017 was speculated to be 90%
  • Note: Good results from a blood test (> 40 ng) does not mean that a good amount of Vitamin D actually gets to cells
  • A Vitamin D test in cells rather than blood was feasible (2017 personal communication)
  •    Commercially available 2019
    However test results would vary in each tissue due to multiple genes
  • Good clues that Vitamin D is being restricted from getting to the cells
    1) A vitamin D-related health problem runs in the family
       especially if it is one of 51+ diseases related to Vitamin D Receptor
    2) Slightly increasing Vitamin D show benefits (even if conventional Vitamin D test shows an increase)
    3) Vitamin D Receptor test (<$30) scores are difficult to understand in 2016
        easier to understand the VDR 23andMe test results analyzed by FoundMyFitness in 2018
    4) Back Pain
        probably want at least 2 clues before taking adding vitamin D, Omega-3, Magnesium, Resveratrol, etc
          The founder of VitaminDWiki took action with clues #3&4

Vitamin D Binding Protein category listing has 122 items and the following introduction

Vitamin D Binding Protein (GC) gene can decrease the bio-available Vitamin D that can get to cells,

  • GC is not the only such gene - there are 3 others, all invisible to standard Vitamin D tests
  • The bio-available calculation does not notice the effect of GC, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and VDR
  • The actual D getting to the cells is a function of measured D and all 4 genes
  • There is >2X increase in 8+ health problems if have poor VDBP (GC)
  • It appears that VDBP only blocks oral vitamin D, but not Vitamin D from sun, UV, topical or inhaled (tissue activated)

Vitamin D Binding Protein has a list of health problems

Increased
Risk
Health Problem
11 XPreeclampsia
6 XFood Allergy
5 XPTSD
4 X, 5XKidney Cancer
4 XPoor Response to Oral Vitamin D
3 XEar infection
2 X MS
2 X Colorectal Cancer
2 XProstate Cancer -in those with dark skins
1.3 XInfertility

One gene restricts how much Vit. D acually gets to cells (not just reduce blood level)

The risk of 44 diseases at least double with poor Vitamin D Receptor as of Oct 2019
Vitamin D Receptor Activation can be increased by any of:
Resveratrol, Omega-3, Magnesium, Zinc, non-daily Vitamin D dosing, etc
   Note: The founder of VitaminDWiki uses 10 of the 12 known VDR activators

Vitamin D Receptor and Cancers

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer - Breast:

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer - Colon:

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer - other:

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer - Skin:

Items in both categories Vitamin D Receptor and Cancer - Prostate:

 Download the PDF from Sci-hub via VitaminDWiki

Sepulveda-Villegas M1, Elizondo-Montemayor L2, Trevino V3.

  • 1 Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Bioinformatics Research Group, Ave. Morones Prieto 3000, Colonia Los Doctores, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64710, Mexico.
  • 2 Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Bioinformatics Research Group, Ave. Morones Prieto 3000, Colonia Los Doctores, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64710, Mexico; Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Center for Research in Clinical Nutrition and Obesity, Ave. Morones Prieto 3000, Colonia Los Doctores, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64710, Mexico; Tecnologico de Monterrey, Cardiovascular and Metabolomics Research Group, Hospital Zambrano Hellion, San Pedro Garza Garcia, P.C., 66278, Mexico.
  • 3 Tecnologico de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina y Ciencias de la Salud, Bioinformatics Research Group, Ave. Morones Prieto 3000, Colonia Los Doctores, Monterrey, Nuevo León 64710, Mexico. Electronic address: vtrevino at tec.mx.

Vitamin D deficiency is a public health concern associated with, but not limited to, skeletal anomalies, chronic diseases, immune conditions, and cancer, among others. Hypovitaminosis D is mainly associated with environmental and lifestyle factors that affect sunlight exposure. However, genetic factors also influence 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) serum concentration. Although there is available information of genes with clear biological relevance or markers identified by Genome-Wide Association Studies, an overall view and screening tool to identify known genetic causes of altered serum levels of 25(OH)D is lacking. Moreover, there are no studies including the total genetic evidence associated with abnormal serum concentration of 25(OH)D.

Therefore, we conducted a de-novo systematic literature review to propose a set of genes comprehensive of all genetic variants reported to be associated with deficiency of vitamin D. Abstracts retrieved from PubMed search were organized by gene and curated one-by-one using the PubTerm web tool. The genes identified were classified according to the type of genetic evidence associated with serum 25(OH)D levels and were also compared with the few commonly screened genes related to vitamin D status. This strategy allowed the identification of 35 genes associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations, 27 (75%) of which are not commercially available and are not, therefore, analyzed in clinical practice for genetic counseling, nor are they sufficiently studied for research purposes. Functional analysis of the genes identified confirmed their role in vitamin D pathways and diseases.

Thus, the list of genes is an important source to understand the genetic determinants of 25(OH)D levels. To further support our findings, we provide a map of the reported functional variants and SNPs not included in ClinVar, minor allelic frequencies, SNP effect sizes, associated diseases, and an integrated overview of the biological role of the genes. In conclusion, we identified a comprehensive candidate list of genes associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations, most of which are not commercially available, but would prove of importance in clinical practice in screening for patients that should respond to supplementation because of alterations in absorption, patients that would have little benefit because alterations in the downstream metabolism of vitamin D, and to study non-responsiveness to supplementation with vitamin D.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Sunday November 10, 2019 02:37:24 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 10)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
12947 36 gene portion of F4.jpg admin 10 Nov, 2019 02:31 53.89 Kb 3
12946 36 genes.jpg admin 10 Nov, 2019 02:31 170.73 Kb 11
12945 36 genes sci-hub.pdf PDF 2019 admin 10 Nov, 2019 02:31 3.16 Mb 2
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