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Vitamin D and Calcium do not increase bone density (also need exercise, Mg, K2, protein etc.) – RCT Aug 2019

Adding Vitamin D by itself does not improve bones - several studies on this page

Effect of High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation on Volumetric Bone Density and Bone Strength, A Randomized Clinical Trial

Lauren A. Burt, PhD1; Emma O. Billington, MD, FRCPC1; Marianne S. Rose, PhD2; et al Duncan A. Raymond, MS1; David A. Hanley, MD, FRCPC1; Steven K. Boyd, PhD1

VitaminDWiki

Vitamin D is NOT MAGIC.
Vitamin D allows improvement only if the necessary components are available
Bone building also needs Exercise, Magnesium, Vitamin K2, Boron, and protein

The study on this page used Calcium and up to 10,000 IU of Vitamin D daily,
   but NO Exercise (all participants had osteroprosis), Mg, K2, B, or protein
Web
https://www.betterbones.com/ discusses importance of Vitamin D, Boron, Exercise, Vitamin K, Protein, Magnesium, etc.

Web articles reporting on the study
High-Dose Vitamin D: No Help for Bone Health
Vitamin D: Too much of a good thing?
Even high dose of Vitamin D does not benefit bone health: JAMA
Higher-Dose Vitamin D in Healthy Adults May Harm Bone Health
LOTS OF VITAMIN D , DOES IT HELP BUILD BONES IN HEALTHY PEOPLE NO NO NO
Why is a high dose of vitamin D not justified for bone health?
Vitamin D: How much is too much of a good thing?
High Doses of Vitamin D Don’t Strengthen Bones - NYT
How taking too much vitamin D puts your health at risk
 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki
Blood Levels started high and plateaued by 3 months
Image
Also note: These groups started with an unusally high level of vitamin D.
It is rare that raising vitamin D levels even higher will produce much benefit


Key Points

  • Question Does higher-dose vitamin D supplementation improve bone mineral density (BMD, measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography) and bone strength (measured as failure load)?
  • Findings In this randomized clinical trial that included 311 healthy adults, treatment with vitamin D for 3 years at a dose of 4000 IU per day or 10 000 IU per day, compared with 400 IU per day, resulted in statistically significant lower radial BMD (calcium hydroxyapatite; −3.9 mg HA/cm3 and −7.5 mg HA/cm3, respectively); tibial BMD was significantly lower only with the daily dose of 10 000 IU. There were no significant differences in bone strength at either the radius or tibia.
  • Meaning Among healthy adults, supplementation with higher doses of vitamin D did not result in improved bone health; further research would be needed to determine whether it is harmful.

Importance Few studies have assessed the effects of daily vitamin D doses at or above the tolerable upper intake level for 12 months or greater, yet 3% of US adults report vitamin D intakes of at least 4000 IU per day.

Objective To assess the dose-dependent effect of vitamin D supplementation on volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) and strength.

Design, Setting, and Participants Three-year, double-blind, randomized clinical trial conducted in a single center in Calgary, Canada, from August 2013 to December 2017, including 311 community-dwelling healthy adults without osteoporosis, aged 55 to 70 years, with baseline levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) of 30 to 125 nmol/L.

Interventions Daily doses of vitamin D3 for 3 years at 400 IU (n = 109), 4000 IU (n = 100), or 10 000 IU (n = 102). Calcium supplementation was provided to participants with dietary intake of less than 1200 mg per day.

Main Outcomes and Measures Co-primary outcomes were total volumetric BMD at radius and tibia, assessed with high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and bone strength (failure load) at radius and tibia estimated by finite element analysis.

Results Of 311 participants who were randomized (53% men; mean [SD] age, 62.2 [4.2] years), 287 (92%) completed the study. Baseline, 3-month, and 3-year levels of 25(OH)D were 76.3, 76.7, and 77.4 nmol/L for the 400-IU group; 81.3, 115.3, and 132.2 for the 4000-IU group; and 78.4, 188.0, and 144.4 for the 10 000-IU group. There were significant group × time interactions for volumetric BMD. At trial end, radial volumetric BMD was lower for the 4000 IU group (−3.9 mg HA/cm3 [95% CI, −6.5 to −1.3]) and 10 000 IU group (−7.5 mg HA/cm3 [95% CI, −10.1 to −5.0]) compared with the 400 IU group with mean percent change in volumetric BMD of −1.2% (400 IU group), −2.4% (4000 IU group), and −3.5% (10 000 IU group). Tibial volumetric BMD differences from the 400 IU group were −1.8 mg HA/cm3 (95% CI, −3.7 to 0.1) in the 4000 IU group and −4.1 mg HA/cm3 in the 10 000 IU group (95% CI, −6.0 to −2.2), with mean percent change values of −0.4% (400 IU), −1.0% (4000 IU), and −1.7% (10 000 IU). There were no significant differences for changes in failure load (radius, P = .06; tibia, P = .12).

Conclusions and Relevance Among healthy adults, treatment with vitamin D for 3 years at a dose of 4000 IU per day or 10 000 IU per day, compared with 400 IU per day, resulted in statistically significant lower radial BMD; tibial BMD was significantly lower only with the 10 000 IU per day dose. There were no significant differences in bone strength at either the radius or tibia. These findings do not support a benefit of high-dose vitamin D supplementation for bone health; further research would be needed to determine whether it is harmful.


10,000 IU VItamin D daily for 3 years did not improve bones after Prostate Cancer - RCT Sept 2019

High-dose vitamin D: negative results from a randomized clinical trial
Also daily 1200 mg of Calcium

Short URL = is.gd/VitDBone

Created by admin. Last Modification: Sunday October 6, 2019 01:47:04 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 28)

Attached files

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12556 10,000 IU Bone.jpg admin 27 Aug, 2019 21:05 22.72 Kb 102
12555 10,000 IU bone.pdf PDF 2019 admin 27 Aug, 2019 21:05 459.25 Kb 42
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