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Preeclampsia 40 percent less likely if mother had more than 20 ng of vitamin D – Jan 2014

Maternal Vitamin D Status and the Risk of Mild and Severe Preeclampsia

Bodnar, Lisa M.; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Catov, Janet M.; Roberts, James M.; Platt, Robert W.; Diesel, Jill C.; Klebanoff, Mark A.

Background: We sought to determine the association between maternal vitamin D status at <=26 weeks' gestation and the risk of preeclampsia by clinical subtype.

Methods: We conducted a case-cohort study among women enrolled at 12 US sites from 1959 to 1966 in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. In serum collected at <=26 weeks' gestation (median 20.9 weeks) from 717 women who later developed preeclampsia (560 mild and 157 severe cases) and from 2986 mothers without preeclampsia, we measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, over 40 years later, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

Results: Half of women in the subcohort had 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) >50 nmol/L. Maternal 25(OH)D 50 to 74.9 nmol/L was associated with a reduction in the absolute and relative risk of preeclampsia and mild preeclampsia compared with 25(OH)D <30 nmol/L in the crude analysis but not after adjustment for confounders, including race, prepregnancy body mass index, and parity. For severe preeclampsia, 25(OH)D >=50 nmol/L was associated with a reduction in three cases per 1000 pregnancies (adjusted risk difference = -0.003 [95% confidence interval = -0.005 to 0.0002]) and a 40% reduction in risk (0.65 [0.43 to 0.98]) compared with 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L. Conclusions were unchanged (1) after restricting to women with 25(OH)D measured before 22 weeks' gestation or (2) with formal sensitivity analyses for unmeasured confounding.

Conclusions: Maternal vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for severe preeclampsia but not for its mild subtypes. Contemporary cohorts with large numbers of severe preeclampsia cases would be needed to confirm or refute these findings.

(C) 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc


See also VitaminDWiki

IU Cumulative Benefit Blood level CofactorsCalcium $*/month
200 Better bones for mom
with 600 mg of Calcium
6 ng/ml increase Not needed No effect $0.10
400 Less Rickets (but not zero with 400 IU)
3X less adolescent Schizophrenia
Fewer child seizures
20-30 ng/ml Not needed No effect $0.20
2000 2X More likely to get pregnant naturally/IVF
2X Fewer dental problems with pregnancy
8X less diabetes
4X fewer C-sections (>37 ng)
4X less preeclampsia (40 ng vs 10 ng)
5X less child asthma
2X fewer language problems age 5
42 ng/ml Desirable < 750 mg $1
4000 2X fewer pregnancy complications
2X fewer pre-term births
49 ng/ml Should have
cofactors
< 750 mg $3
6000 Probable: larger benefits for above items
Just enough D for breastfed infant
More maternal and infant weight
Should have
cofactors
< 750 mg $4
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