Loading...
 
Translate Register Log In Login with facebookLogin and Register

No weight loss when average over trials lasting 6 weeks and only 200 IU of vitamin D – meta-analysis July 2013

25-Hydroxyvitamin D Supplementation and BMI Change: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

J Obes Weight Loss Ther 3:181. doi: 10.4172/2165-7904.1000181
1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Mora N1*, 1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Rieke K1,
2 Departments of Surgery, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Plitcha J2, 1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Segura AJ1,
3 Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Leehey D3, 1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA DeShong K1, 1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
3 Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
4 Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Kramer H1,3,4 and 1Public Health Program, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
4 Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA Durazo R1,4

Corresponding Author : Nallely Mora; Public Health Program, Loyola Medical Center; 2160 S. First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA; Tel: 708-327-9018; Fax: 708-327-9009; E-mail: moranallely at gmail.com
Received June 06, 2013; Accepted July 07, 2013; Published July 09, 2013

The impact of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) supplementation on weight change remains controversial. The objective of this study was to summarize the effects of 25[OH]D supplementation (cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol) on BMI change through a meta-analysis of published clinical trials.
We completed a systematic review of English articles, using MEDLINE (Ovid, Pubmed) from January 1, 1998 through January 1, 2013. The articles selected focused on 25[OH]D supplementation and body mass index (BMI) in randomized controlled trials (RCT’s).
The association between 25[OH]D and mean BMI change was estimated utilizing a random effects model. A total of 30 studies were reviewed and 9 were included in the meta-analysis. Total participants included 1651 adults (82.6% women and mean age 47.9 years) and mean follow-up ranged between 6 to 196 weeks and mean daily 25[OH]D dose ranged from 200 IU to 1,110 IU. Five of the 9 studies included calcium supplementation in both groups. Average baseline BMI was 30.7 and 30.4 kg/m2 in the intervention and control groups, respectively.
Five studies suggested a beneficial effect for 25[OH]D supplementation for BMI change whereas 3 studies showed no effect of 25[OH]D supplementation on BMI change, and one showed a non-perceptible change. Meta-analysis of BMI values at end of trial showed no statistically significant difference in BMI change by use of 25[OH]D supplementation. Based on existing published trials, oral 25[OH]D supplementation does not significantly impact BMI change.
Image


It is truly amazing how most meta-analysis ignore extremely important parameters: in this case:

  1. Ignores amount of vitamin D - one study used just 200 IU
  2. Ignores duration of vitamin D intervention - one study lasted just 6 weeks (and it takes longer than that for vitamin D levels to stabilize in the body)
  3. ignores the vitamin D levels of the women
  4. ignores how/when the vitamin D was taken (which can change the response by as much as 2X)
  5. Ignores if Calcium was used or not
  6. Ignores if there was enough Magnesium (water, food, supplements)
  7. Ignores that obesity reduction occurs typically for only about 1 /3 of the women
  8. Ignored how obese the women were (those who are very obese need far more vitamin D to get the same blood level response)

PDF is attached at the bottom of this page

See also VitaminDWiki

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
3197 BMI T2.jpg admin 03 Nov, 2013 00:47 110.30 Kb 656
3195 bmi and vitamin D meta-analysis.pdf PDF - 2013 admin 03 Nov, 2013 00:25 795.69 Kb 703
See any problem with this page? Report it (FINALLY WORKS)