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Medical insurance does not compensate for job loss by older workers who are hospitalized – Sept 2016

The Economic Consequences of Hospital Admissions

Carlos Dobkin, Amy Finkelstein, Raymond Kluender, Matthew J. Notowidigdo
NBER Working Paper No. 22288
Issued in May 2016, Revised in August 2016
NBER Program(s):Health Care, Public Economics

VitaminDWiki

This study points out the huge loss of income resulting from hospitilization, which is not covered by insurance
Analysis is primarily on 2700 adults aged 50-59 for all types of hospitalizations
Note: It does not seem to consider those who died in the hospital
Vitamin D can sometimes

  • Prevent the hospitalization
  • Reduce the stay in the hospital (and thus the deductables and co-pays)
  • Improve the outcome ==> less likely to lose job

See also VitaminDWiki


Age 50-59
Image

We examine some economic impacts of hospital admissions using an event study approach in two datasets: survey data from the Health and Retirement Study, and hospital admissions data linked to consumer credit reports. We report estimates of the impact of hospital admissions on out-of-pocket medical spending, unpaid medical bills, bankruptcy, earnings, income (and its components), access to credit, and consumer borrowing. The results point to three primary conclusions: non-elderly adults with health insurance still face considerable exposure to uninsured earnings risk; a large share of the incremental risk exposure for uninsured non-elderly adults is borne by third parties who absorb their unpaid medical bills; the elderly face very little economic risk from adverse health shocks.

 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
10509 The Economic Consequences of Hospital Admissions.compressed.pdf admin 09 Sep, 2018 15:08 589.50 Kb 24
10508 50-59 employment.jpg admin 09 Sep, 2018 15:07 20.30 Kb 19
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