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Lung Cancer death 60 percent less likely if high level of vitamin D – 2 meta-analysis 2017


Lung Cancer mortality reduced 55% if Vitamin D at 40 ng - Meta-analysis Nov 2017

Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and lung cancer risk and survival – A dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
Medicine Journal Oct 2017 http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000008613
Qianqian Feng, MD, Han Zhang, MD, Zhengqin Dong, MD, Yang Zhou, MD, Jingping Ma, MD*
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Lower serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with several negative outcomes. However, previous studies have indicated that 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with lung cancer risk and survival, but presented controversial results.
PubMed and Embase databases were searched update to August 2017 to identify and quantify the potential association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and lung cancer risk and survival.
Seventeen eligible studies involving a total of 138,858 participants with 4368 incident cases were included in this meta-analysis. Our results showed statistically significant association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and lung cancer risk and mortality.

However, circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D was not associated with overall lung cancer survival. Furthermore, compared with the lowest circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the highest circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D is significantly decreased risk of lung cancer risk in male and female. In addition, the highest circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly associated with a lower risk in Caucasian and Asian.

We also obtained the best fit at an inflection point of 10 nmol/L in piecewise regression analysis, increasing 10 nmol/L dose of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with an 8% reduction in the risk of lung cancer risk and an 7% reduction in the risk of lung cancer mortality. Subgroup meta-analyses in study quality, number of participants, and number of cases showed consistent with the primary findings.
The highest circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with decreased lung cancer risk and mortality but not overall survival

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Meta-analysis of the correlation between vitamin D and lung cancer risk and outcomes - June 2017

Oncotarget. 2017 Jun 28. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.18766. [Epub ahead of print]


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Lung Cancer Mortality
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Lung Cancer Risk (prevent)
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Liu J1, Dong Y1, Lu C2, Wang Y1, Peng L1, Jiang M3, Tang Y1, Zhao Q1.

  • 1 Department of Thoracic Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310003, China.
  • 2 Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310003, China.
  • 3 Department of Radiotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang Traditional Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, 310006, China.

In this meta-analysis, we analyzed the association between vitamin D levels and lung carcinoma risk and outcomes. Two authors independently searched the Web of Science, Pubmed, EBSCO and Ovid MEDLINE resources with the key words "vitamin D, lung cancer, solar and latitude" and enrolled 22 studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. The summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random (or fixed)-effects model. Potential confounders were carefully adjusted. High vitamin D (or calcium) intake and serum 25(OH)D levels each correlated inversely with lung cancer risk [OR = 0.72 (95% CI: 0.61-0.85, p < 0.001) and OR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.83-0.97, p < 0.05) ].
High circulating 25(OH)D levels also reduced lung cancer mortality with the pooled OR reached 0.39 (95% CI: 0.28-0.54, p < 0.001)]. A positive trend was presented in the relationship between serum 25(OH) D and survival (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.87-1.18, p = 0.87).
Subgroup analysis revealed that nonsmokers had higher vitamin D levels, which correlated negatively with lung cancer risk (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.65-0.88, p < 0.01).
Moreover, lower sun exposure and high latitude associated with lower vitamin D levels. This meta-analysis shows that high vitamin D (or calcium) intake and serum 25(OH)D levels correlate with lower lung cancer risk and better prognosis. UVB and latitude may play a vital role in lung cancer occurrence and progression, although a direct evidence hasn't been obtained.

PMID: 28678758 DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.18766

Created by admin. Last Modification: Friday December 29, 2017 07:43:55 UTC by admin. (Version 12)

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9051 Lung Cancer Feng.jpg admin 29 Dec, 2017 07:40 19.54 Kb 172
9050 lung cancer risk and survival.pdf PDF 2017 admin 29 Dec, 2017 07:39 327.00 Kb 43
8681 Lung Cancer risk T1.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2017 23:21 21.93 Kb 185
8680 Lunc Cancer mortality F4.jpg admin 09 Nov, 2017 23:21 11.43 Kb 181
8151 Lung Cancer Meta-analysis.pdf PDF 2017 admin 06 Jul, 2017 13:46 1.39 Mb 94
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