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Inflammation of middle eye (Anterior Uveitis) 3 times more likely if low vitamin D – Dec 2016

Association of Low Vitamin D Levels With Noninfectious Anterior Uveitis.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2016 Dec 22. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2016.4888. [Epub ahead of print]
Grotting LA1, Davoudi S1, Palenzuela D2, Papaliodis GN1, Sobrin L1.


Vitamin D plays an important role in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. It has been shown to contribute to the etiology of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases through the upregulation of type 2 anti-inflammatory T helper cells and the suppression of type 1 T helper cells. Noninfectious uveitis is postulated to be caused by immune dysfunction.

OBJECTIVE:
To determine whether there is an association between vitamin D levels and noninfectious anterior uveitis.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:
This was a case-control study. We identified patients with and without noninfectious uveitis using the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Ocular Inflammation Database and electronic medical records from March 1, 2008, to December 12, 2015, at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Uveitis and Comprehensive Ophthalmology Clinics. One hundred patients with noninfectious anterior uveitis and 100 patients without uveitis were recruited. Patients with noninfectious uveitis were diagnosed by fellowship-trained uveitis specialists after exclusion of infectious causes and neoplastic masquerades of uveitis. All patients included had a total 25-hydroxyvitamin D level recorded. Multivariate regression models were constructed to determine the association between vitamin D levels and the presence of uveitis.

MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE:
Presence of noninfectious anterior uveitis.

RESULTS:
We identified 100 patients (64 white, 8 African American, 25 Asian, and 3 Hispanic) with a mean (SD) age of 51.8 (15.9) years (26 men) and 100 control individuals (58 white, 23 African American, 8 Asian, and 11 Hispanic) with a mean (SD) age of 53.6 (16.2) years (27 men). Hypovitaminosis D was associated with noninfectious uveitis in the univariate analysis (odds ratio, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.42-4.51; P = .002). The association in multivariate regression after adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity was 2.96 (95% CI, 1.60-5.50; P = .001) The odds of developing uveitis were 4% lower for every 1-ng/mL increase in vitamin D level (odds ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99; P = .01) in the main multivariate analysis.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:
In this retrospective study, lower vitamin D levels were associated with an increased risk of noninfectious anterior uveitis. However, this does not confirm a causal effect.

PMID: 28006052 DOI: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2016.4888

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