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Infant allergy to cow’s milk will go away if have high levels of vitamin D – Jan 2017

Pediatr Res. 2017 Jan 18. doi: 10.1038/pr.2017.12. [Epub ahead of print]
García LP1, Muñoz JL2, Alonso-Lebrero E3, Reula ES2,4, Pion M2, Correa-Rocha R2.

  • 1Department of Bioactivity and Food Analysisof theCIAL-CSIC, Madrid (Spain).
  • 2Laboratory of Immune-regulation, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Madrid (Spain).
  • 3Pediatric-Allergy Division, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Madrid (Spain).
  • 4Immunology and Allergy Pediatric Division of the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón and Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Madrid (Spain).

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BACKGROUND:
Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the most common food allergy in infants. However, little is known about which specific immune mechanisms are related with the CMPA onset. The objective was to investigate which immune alterations constitute differential factors between allergy and tolerance, and hence could be implicated in the CMPA establishment in infants.

METHODS:
An extensive analysis of immune subsets, including Treg and cytokine-secreting cells was performed in blood samples from 28 infants younger than 9 months obtained 1-4 days after the first adverse reaction to milk.

RESULTS:
Less than 4 days after first allergic reaction, infants who developed CMPA had decreased Treg counts and increased frequency of IL4-secreting CD4 T cells compared to controls. The deficit of Tregs was correlated with decreased serum levels of vitamin D. Values of Tregs, IL4-secreting cells and vitamin D were good predictors of CMPA diagnosis.
Basal vitamin D levels in CMPA infants also predicted those CMPA patients developing spontaneous tolerance in the first year.

CONCLUSIONS:
Establishment of CMPA in infants was related with lower Treg and vitamin D levels. These immune alterations would be crucial factors behind the CMPA establishment and they could constitute a therapeutic target for treatment of CMPA.Pediatric Research (2017);
doi:10.1038/pr.2017.12.

PMID: 28099424 DOI: 10.1038/pr.2017.12


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  • Milk Allergy Fooed Allergy Research and Education (before 2017)
    "Allergy to cow’s milk is the most common food allergy in infants and young children. Symptoms of a milk allergy reaction can range from mild, such as hives, to severe, such as anaphylaxis. "
  • "Approximately 2.5 percent of children younger than three years of age are allergic to milk. Nearly all infants who develop an allergy to milk do so in their first year of life. Most children eventually outgrow a milk allergy."
  • :Milk allergy should not be confused with lactose intolerance. A food allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to a specific food protein. When the food protein is ingested, in can trigger an allergic reaction that may include a range of symptoms from mild symptoms (rashes, hives, itching, swelling, etc.) to severe symptoms (trouble breathing, wheezing, loss of consciousness, etc.). A food allergy can be potentially fatal.


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