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IBD surgery 5X more likely for non-caucasians with low vitamin D – Oct 2012

Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in a multicultural inflammatory bowel disease cohort

Frontline Gastroenterol doi:10.1136/flgastro-2012-100231
Sukhdev Chatu, Vivek Chhaya, Rosamund Holmes, Penny Neild, Jin-Yong Kang, Richard C Pollok, Andrew Poullis
Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, London, UK
Dr Andrew Poullis, Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT, UK; apoullis at sgul.ac.uk
Received 12 July 2012, Revised 5 September 2012, Accepted 6 September 2012, Published Online First 30 October 2012

Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a multicultural inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cohort and determine predictors of deficiency including ethnicity.

Design Patients with IBD were recruited into a dedicated database over a 6-month period and evaluated retrospectively.

Setting Department of Gastroenterology, St George's University Hospital, London, UK.

Outcomes measured Clinical data including demographics, ethnic group, disease phenotype by the Montreal classification, vitamin D level and season tested were recorded from clinical and electronic medical records. Vitamin D levels were classified as normal (?50?nmol/l) and deficient (<50?nmol/l).

Results 168 patients had a vitamin D level measured subsequent to diagnosis.
There was no significant difference in the median vitamin D level between patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) (39?nmol/l (IQR 23–56) vs 28?nmol/l (IQR 17–51), p=0.35).

Overall the median vitamin D level was significantly lower in non-Caucasians (Asian and Black) versus Caucasians (28?nmol/l (IQR 17–41) vs 41?nmol/l (IQR 25–63), p<0.0001).

Multiple regression analysis revealed

  • IBD related surgery (OR 2.9) and
  • ethnicity (OR 6.0 non-Caucasian vs Caucasian) in CD and
  • ethnicity (OR 5.0 non-Caucasian vs Caucasian) in UC

were independently associated with vitamin D deficiency.

Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is common in IBD patients; therefore, we suggest monitoring of vitamin D levels and correction with supplements especially in non-Caucasians and those with a history of IBD related surgery.
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See also VitaminDWiki

see wikipage such as http://www.vitamindwiki.com/tiki-index.php?page_id=2582

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