Loading...
 
Translate Register Log In Login with facebookLogin and Register

Every child with kidney problems (ideopathic nephrotic syndrome) had low vitamin D – Oct 2015

Vitamin D in incident nephrotic syndrome: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

Pediatr Nephrol. 2015 Oct 23. [Epub ahead of print]
Selewski DT1, Chen A2, Shatat IF3,4, Pais P5, Greenbaum LA6, Geier P7, Nelson RD8, Kiessling SG9, Brophy PD10, Quiroga A11, Seifert ME12,13, Straatmann CE14, Mahan JD15, Ferris ME16, Troost JP17, Gipson DS17.

VitaminDWiki


Overview Kidney and vitamin D contains the following summary

  • FACT: Kidney is the primary way to activate vitamin D
  • FACT: When the Kidney has problems, there is less active vitamin D (Calcitriol) for the body
  • FACT: When the Kidney has problems, there is increased death due to many factors - many of which are associated with lack of Calcitriol
  • FACT: There are many on-going intervention clinical trials trying to determine how much of what kind of vitamin D is needed to treat the problem
  • FACT: One Randomized Controlled Trial has proven that Vitamin D treats CKD
  • FACT: Taking extra Vitamin D, in various forms, does not cause health problems - even if poor kidney
  • Suggestion: Increase vitamin D getting into body now - and increase co-factors so that the vitamin D can be better used
      Sun, UV lamp, Vitamin D supplement - probably > 5,000 IU,
    Calcitriol - which bypasses the need for the kidney to activate vitamin D
      Problems with Calcitriol however: typically only lasts for a few hours, also, possible complications
        Update: Pre-cursor of active vitamin D made from plants is better than calcitriol – Sept 2012
  • Category Kidney and Vitamin D contains 180 items

Kidney Intervention trials using Vitamin D:

Pages listed in BOTH of the categories Infant/Child and Kidney


BACKGROUND:
Cross-sectional studies of children with prevalent nephrotic syndrome (NS) have shown 25-vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency rates of 20-100 %. Information on 25(OH)D status in incident patients or following remission is limited. This study aimed to assess 25(OH)D status of incident idiopathic NS children at presentation and longitudinally with short-term observation.

METHODS:
Multicenter longitudinal study of children (2-18 years old) from 14 centers across the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium with incident idiopathic NS. 25(OH)D levels were assessed at diagnosis and 3 months later.

RESULTS:
Sixty-one children, median age 5 (3, 11) years, completed baseline visit and 51 completed second visit labs. All 61 (100 %) had 25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml at diagnosis. Twenty-seven (53 %) had 25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml at follow-up. Fourteen (28 %) children were steroid resistant. Univariate analysis showed that children prescribed vitamin D supplements were less likely to have 25(OH)D deficiency at follow-up (OR 0.2, 95 % CI 0.04, 0.6). Steroid response, age, and season did not predict 25(OH)D deficiency. Multivariable linear regression modeling showed higher 25(OH)D levels at follow-up by 13.2 ng/ml (SE 4.6, p < 0.01) in children supplemented with vitamin D.

CONCLUSIONS:
In this incident idiopathic NS cohort, all children at diagnosis had 25(OH)D deficiency and the majority continued to have a deficiency at 2-4 months. Supplemental vitamin D decreased the odds of 25(OH)D deficiency at follow-up, supporting a role for supplementation in incident NS.

PMID: 26498119

Publisher wants $40 for the PDF

See any problem with this page? Report it (FINALLY WORKS)