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Elderly 3X more likely to have 30 ng of vitamin D if frequently eat fatty fish, eggs – Aug 2013

Proposal and validation of a quick question to rate the influence of diet in geriatric epidemiological studies on vitamin d.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2013;83(4):254-8. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000163.
Gaëlle Chevallereau1, Xavier Gleyses2, Laurène Roussel3, Sarah Hamdan4, Olivier Beauchet5, Cédric Annweiler6
1Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
2Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
3Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
4Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
5Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital; Angers University Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
6Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital; Angers University Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;, and Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada Author information

BACKGROUND:
Diet is a major exogenous source of vitamin D. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether the yes/no answer to a simple question exploring diet
("Do you eat fatty fish at least once a week and/or eggs several times per week?")
could be associated with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D status among 261 older in- and outpatients (mean ± standard deviation, 83.5 ± 8.1 years).
METHODS:
Two groups were distinguished based on the binary yes/no answer. Hypovitaminosis D was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤ 75 nmol/L.
RESULTS:
More participants with hypovitaminosis D answered "No" to the question on diet compared to their counterparts (p = 0.002). Answering "No" was associated with hypovitaminosis D (OR = 3.22, p = 0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders, with a positive predictive value = 79 %.
CONCLUSION:
A simple dietary question may identify older patients with hypovitaminosis D who should receive vitamin D supplements.

PMID: 25008016


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See also VitaminDWiki

  1. Senior skin produces 3X less Vitamin D for the same sun intensity
  2. Seniors have fewer vitamin D receptors as they age
    • (The effect of low Vitamin D receptor genes does not show up on vitamin D test results)
  3. Seniors are indoors more than than when they were younger
    • not as agile, weaker muscles; frail, no longer enjoy hot temperatures
    • (if outside, stay in the shade), however, seniors might start outdoor activities like gardening, biking, etc.
  4. Seniors wear more clothing outdoors than when younger **+fear skin cancer/wrinkles, sometimes avoid bright light after cataract surgery
  5. Seniors often take various drugs which reduce vitamin D (some would not show up on vitamin D test) statins, chemotherapy, anti-depressants, blood pressure, beta-blockers, etc
  6. Seniors often have one or more diseases which consume vitamin D ( osteoporosis, diabetes, MS, ...)
  7. Seniors generally put on weight at they age - and a heavier body requires more vitamin D
  8. Seniors often (40%) have fatty livers – which do not process vitamin D as well
  9. Seniors not have as much Magnesium needed to use vitamin D
    (would not show up on vitamin D test)
  10. Seniors with poorly functioning kidneys do not process vitamin D as well
    (would not show up on vitamin D test) 2009 full text online  Also PDF 2009
  11. Vitamin D is not as bioavailable in senior digestive systems (Stomach acid or intestines?)
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