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Elderly 3X more likely to have 30 ng of vitamin D if frequently eat fatty fish, eggs – Aug 2013

Proposal and validation of a quick question to rate the influence of diet in geriatric epidemiological studies on vitamin d.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2013;83(4):254-8. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000163.
Gaëlle Chevallereau1, Xavier Gleyses2, Laurène Roussel3, Sarah Hamdan4, Olivier Beauchet5, Cédric Annweiler6
1Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
2Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
3Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
4Medical School, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
5Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital; Angers University Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;
6Department of Neuroscience, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Angers University Hospital; Angers University Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, UNAM, Angers, France;, and Robarts Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada Author information

BACKGROUND:
Diet is a major exogenous source of vitamin D. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether the yes/no answer to a simple question exploring diet
("Do you eat fatty fish at least once a week and/or eggs several times per week?")
could be associated with serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D status among 261 older in- and outpatients (mean ± standard deviation, 83.5 ± 8.1 years).
METHODS:
Two groups were distinguished based on the binary yes/no answer. Hypovitaminosis D was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤ 75 nmol/L.
RESULTS:
More participants with hypovitaminosis D answered "No" to the question on diet compared to their counterparts (p = 0.002). Answering "No" was associated with hypovitaminosis D (OR = 3.22, p = 0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders, with a positive predictive value = 79 %.
CONCLUSION:
A simple dietary question may identify older patients with hypovitaminosis D who should receive vitamin D supplements.

PMID: 25008016


Publisher wants $28 for the PDF

See also VitaminDWiki

  1. Senior skin produces 3X less Vitamin D for the same sun intensity
  2. Seniors have fewer vitamin D receptors as they age
    (The effect of low Vitamin D receptor genes does not show up on vitamin D test results)
  3. Seniors are indoors more than when when they were younger
    not as agile, weaker muscles; frail, no longer enjoy hot temperatures
    (if outside, stay in the shade), however, seniors might start outdoor activities like gardening, biking, etc.
  4. Seniors wear more clothing outdoors than when younger
    fear skin cancer/wrinkles, sometimes avoid bright light after cataract surgery
  5. Seniors often take various drugs which reduce vitamin D (some would not show up on vitamin D test) statins, chemotherapy, anti-depressants, blood pressure, beta-blockers, etc
  6. Seniors often have one or more diseases which consume vitamin D ( osteoporosis, diabetes, MS, ...)
  7. Seniors generally put on weight at they age - and a heavier body requires more vitamin D
  8. Seniors often (40%) have fatty livers – which do not process vitamin D as well
  9. Seniors not have as much Magnesium needed to use vitamin D
    (would not show up on vitamin D test)
  10. Seniors with poorly functioning kidneys do not process vitamin D as well
    (would not show up on vitamin D test) 2009 full text online  Also PDF 2009
  11. Vitamin D is not as bioavailable in senior digestive systems (Stomach acid or intestines?)
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