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Diabetic Foot Ulcer 3.2 X or 3.6 X more likely if low vitamin D – meta-analyses 2019

There are two Diabetic Foot Anayses on this page:

Vitamin D and diabetic foot ulcer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

3.2X March 2019
Nutrition & Diabetes volume 9, Article number: 8 (2019)
Jiezhi Dai, Chaoyin Jiang, Hua Chen & Yimin Chai

 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki

We aimed to evaluate the association between vitamin D deficiency and diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) in patients with diabetes. Pubmed, EMBASE, BIOSIS, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge, last updated in July 2018, were searched. We assessed eligible studies for the association between vitamin D deficiency and DFU in diabetic patients. The mean difference (MD) or the odds ratio (OR) was calculated for continuous or dichotomous data respectively. Data were analyzed by using the Cochrane Collaboration’s RevMan 5.0 software. Seven studies that involved 1115 patients were included in this study. There were significantly reduced vitamin D levels in DFU (MD −13.47 nmol/L, 95%CI −16.84 to −10.10; P  =  0.34, I2 = 12%).
Severe vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with an increased risk of DFU (OR 3.22, 95%CI 2.42−4.28; P  = 0.64, I2 = 0%). This is the first meta-analysis demonstrating the association between serum vitamin D levels and DFU. Severe vitamin D deficiency is significantly associated with an increased risk of DFU.


Is there an association between vitamin D and diabetic foot disease? A meta-analysis.

3.6X Oct 2019
Wound Repair Regen. 2019 Oct 21. doi: 10.1111/wrr.12762.
Yammine K1,2,3, Hayek F4, Assi C1,3.
1 Dept of Orthopedic Surgery, Lebanese American University Medical Center-Rizk Hospital, Lebanese American University, School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon.
2 Diabetic Foot Clinic, Lebanese American University Medical Center-Rizk Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon.
3 Center for Evidence-Based Anatomy, Sport & Orthopedics Research, Beirut, Lebanon.
4 Division of Vascular Surgery, Lebanese American University Medical Center-Rizk Hospital, Lebanese American University, School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon.

It has been demonstrated that Vitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency is associated with diabetes and with diabetic neuropathy. Some reports stated that vitamin D deficiency is also associated with diabetic foot ulcer and/or infection. Knowing the beneficial effect of vitamin D on wound healing, a quantitative evidence synthesis is needed to look for such association. Medline, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched for from inception. The outcomes were set to be either the serum 25(OH)D level or the prevalence of patients with 25(OH)D with severe deficiency. Ten studies met the inclusion criteria with 1,644 patients; 817 diabetic patients with foot ulcers and 827 patients having diabetes without foot complications. The weighted mean differences was -0.93 (95% CI = -1.684 to -0.174, I2 = 97.8%, p = 0.01). The odds ratio of having severe vitamin D deficiency was 3.6 (95% CI = 2.940 to 4.415, I2 = 40.9%, p < 0.0001), in favor of the foot group. The quality of the included studies was found to be good to excellent. Diabetic foot complications are associated with significantly lower levels of vitamin D. Patients with diabetic ulcers or diabetic infection are at higher risk of bearing severe vitamin D deficiency. Knowing the beneficial effect of vitamin D on wound healing, it is likely that recognizing and supplementing with vitamin D could prevent or improve the outcomes of diabetic foot complications.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Thursday November 28, 2019 11:36:29 GMT-0000 by admin. (Version 6)

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11574 diabetic foot ulcer meta.pdf PDF 2019 admin 16 Mar, 2019 11:16 783.76 Kb 44
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