Loading...
 
Translate Register Log In Login with facebookLogin and Register

Crohn’s disease deficient in vitamin K – IBD deficient in vitamins K and D – April 2011

Association of vitamin K deficiency with bone metabolism and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

doi:10.1016/j.nut.2010.10.021 Applied nutritional investigation
Sachiko Nakajima M.D.a, Hideki Iijima M.D., Ph.D.a, Corresponding Author Contact Information, E-mail The Corresponding Author, Satoshi Egawa M.D., Ph.D.a, Shinichiro Shinzaki M.D., Ph.D.a, Jumpei Kondo M.D.a, Takahiro Inoue M.D.a, Yoshito Hayashi M.D.a, Jin Ying M.D.a, Akira Mukai M.D.a, Tomofumi Akasaka M.D.a, Tsutomu Nishida M.D., Ph.D.a, Tatsuya Kanto M.D., Ph.D.a, b, Masahiko Tsujii M.D., Ph.D.a and Norio Hayashi M.D., Ph.D.a
a Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
b Department of Dendritic Cell Biology and Clinical Application, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
Received 30 January 2010; accepted 28 October 2010. Available online 9 April 2011.

Objective
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory process in the digestive tract and patients with IBD develop osteopenia. Although vitamins K and D are important for maintaining bone health and inhibiting inflammation, their roles in patients with IBD are not clear. We investigated the roles of vitamins K and D in the bone health and inflammation in patients with IBD.

Methods
Bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with IBD (Crohn’s disease (CD), n = 47, and ulcerative colitis (UC), n = 40) was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Vitamin K and D levels of patients with IBD and healthy volunteers (n = 41) were evaluated by measuring serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D, respectively. Clinical activity index was evaluated in patients with CD and UC.

Results
BMD was low in patients with CD and UC. Serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin levels were significantly higher in patients with CD, but not with UC, compared with healthy subjects, indicating that bone vitamin K is insufficient in patients with CD. The levels of undercarboxylated osteocalcin were significantly correlated with the clinical activity index of CD, although they were not correlated with BMD.

The levels of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D were significantly lower in patients with CD and UC than in healthy subjects. The levels of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D were inversely correlated with BMD in patients with UC and were not correlated with the clinical activity index of CD.

Conclusion
Vitamins K and D are insufficient in patients with IBD. Insufficiency of vitamin K is suggested to be associated with inflammatory processes of CD.


See also at VitaminDWiki

See any problem with this page? Report it (FINALLY WORKS)