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Autism decreased in 8 out of 10 children supplemented with vitamin D – April 2015

Vitamin D status in autism spectrum disorders and the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in autistic children.

Nutr Neurosci. 2015 Apr 15. [Epub ahead of print]
Saad K, Abdel-Rahman AA, Elserogy YM, Al-Atram AA, Cannell JJ, Bjørklund G, Abdel-Reheim MK, Othman HA, El-Houfey AA, Hashem EA, Abd El-Aziz NH, Abd El-Baseer KA, Ahmed AE, Ali AM.
*Corresponding author: khaled.ali at med.au.edu.eg
1: Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt
2: Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt
3: Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Almajmaah University, KSA
4: Vitamin D Council, 1411 Marsh Street, Suite 203, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, USA
5: Council for Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, Mo i Rana, Norway
6: Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, UK
7: Department of Clinical Pathology, Aswan University, Egypt
8: Department of Community Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Assiut University, Egypt
9: Department of Pediatrics, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University, Egypt

VitaminDWiki Summary

57% had < 20 ng of vitamin D
30% had 20-30 ng of vitamin D
Supplemented for 3 months
300 IU/kg/day (not to exceed 5000 IU/day)
80% had significant improved outcome
See also VitaminDWiki

See also web


Objectives Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by pervasive deficits in social interaction, impairment in verbal and non-verbal communication, and stereotyped patterns of interests and activities. Vitamin-D deficiency was previously reported in autistic children. However, the data on the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the severity of autism are limited.

Methods We performed a case-controlled cross-sectional analysis conducted on 122 ASD children, to assess their vitamin D status compared to controls and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the severity of autism. We also conducted an open trial of vitamin D supplementation in ASD children.

Results Fifty-seven percent of the patients in the present study had vitamin D deficiency, and 30% had vitamin D insufficiency. The mean 25-OHD levels in patients with severe autism were significantly lower than those in patients with mild/moderate autism. Serum 25-OHD levels had significant negative correlations with Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) scores. Of the ASD group, 106 patients with low-serum 25-OHD levels (<30 ng/ml) participated in the open label trial. They received vitamin D3 (300 IU/kg/day not to exceed 5000 IU/day) for 3 months. Eighty-three subjects completed 3 months of daily vitamin D treatment. Collectively, 80.72% (67/83) of subjects who received vitamin D3 treatment had significantly improved outcome, which was mainly in the sections of the CARS and aberrant behavior checklist subscales that measure behavior, stereotypy, eye contact, and attention span.

Conclusion Vitamin D is inexpensive, readily available and safe. It may have beneficial effects in ASD subjects, especially when the final serum level is more than 40 ng/ml. Trial registration number UMIN-CTR Study Design: trial Number: R000016846.

PMID: 25876214
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References

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VitaminD3World Sept 2015 newsletter on the report

Vitamin D deficiency correlates with severity of Autism and shows improvement with supplementation

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by pervasive deficits in social interaction, impairment in verbal and non-verbal communication, and stereotyped patterns of interests and activities. Vitamin D deficiency has been previously reported in autistic children. However, the data on the relationship between Vitamin D deficiency and the severity of autism are limited.
In this study the researchers performed a case-controlled cross-sectional analysis on 122 ASD children, to assess their Vitamin D status compared to controls and the relationship between the degree of Vitamin D deficiency and the severity of autism.

They then conducted an open trial of Vitamin D supplementation in ASD children.
Fifty-seven percent of the patients in the study had Vitamin D deficiency, and 30% had Vitamin D insufficiency. The Vitamin D levels in patients with severe autism were significantly lower than those in patients with mild/moderate autism. Vitamin D levels had significant negative correlations with Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) scores.

106 patients with low serum Vitamin D levels (<30 ng/ml) then participated in an open label trial of Vitamin D supplementation.
Patients were given 300 IU/kg/day (not to exceed 5000 IU/day) for 3 months.
Eighty-three subjects completed 3 months of daily vitamin D treatment.

80.72% (67/83) of subjects who received Vitamin D3 treatment had significantly improved outcome, which was mainly in the sections of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale and aberrant behavior checklist subscales that measure behavior, stereotypye, eye contact, and attention span. Of the 16 parameters measured, 10 showed highly statistically significant improvements (see table below)

Parameter P Value
(* highly statistically significant)
Relating to people <0.001*
Emotional Response <0.001*
Imitation <0.001*
Body use 0.01*
Object use 0.01*
Adaption to change 0.004*
Listening response 0.01*
Taste, smell, touch 0.1
Visual response 0.003*
Fear 0.13
Verbal communication 0.3
Activity level 0.32
Non-verbal communication 0.2
Intellectual response 0.1
General impression <0.001*
Total CARS score <.001*


The authors concluded that as Vitamin D is inexpensive, readily available and safe.
It may have beneficial effects in ASD subjects, especially when the final serum level is more than 40 ng/ml.

It should be noted that these results were achieved after only three months of Vitamin D supplementation. In a condition that is often present at birth and lasts a lifetime, this is a highly significant finding and should be should be fully explored immediately.

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